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Frequently Asked Questions
about Home Inspections in Arkansas


What is a home inspection?
What does a home inspection include?
Do I need a home inspection in Arkansas?
How much does a home inpection cost?
Why can't I do it myself?
Can a house fail inspection?
How do I find a home inspector in Arkansas?
What is ASHI?
What are the requirements for an Arkansas home inspector?
When do I call a home inspector?
Do I have to be there?
What if the report reveals problems?
If the house proves to be in good condition, did I really need an inspection?
What should I know about mold?
Will the inspector test for Radon?
What forms of payment do you accept?
Don't see your question listed here? Ask Richard.

What is a home inspection?
A home inspection is an objective visual examination of the physical structure and systems of a house, from the roof to the foundation.
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What does a home inspection include?
The standard home inspector’s report will cover the condition of the home’s heating system; central air conditioning system; interior plumbing and electrical systems; the roof, attic and visible insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors; the foundation, basement and structural components.

The Arkansas Home Inspector Registration Board has adopted the Rules and Procedures that identifies what the inspector must inspect and report to you about the home. The American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) also publishes a Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics that outlines what you should expect to be covered in your home inspection report.
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Do I need a home inspection in Arkansas?
Hiring a certified home inspector will help you avoid a home inspection nightmare.

Buying a home in Arkansas could be the largest single investment you will ever make. To minimize unpleasant surprises and unexpected difficulties, you’ll want to learn as much as you can about the newly constructed or existing house before you buy it. A home inspection may identify the need for major repairs or builder oversights, as well as the need for maintenance to keep it in good shape. After the inspection, you will know more about the house, which will allow you to make decisions with confidence.

If you are planning to sell your home, a home inspection can give you the opportunity to make repairs that will put the house in better selling condition.
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How much does a home inpection cost?
Don't let cost be a factor in deciding whether or not to have a home inspection. The sense of security and knowledge gained from an inspection is well worth the cost, and a lowest-priced inspection is not necessarily a bargain. Use the inspector’s qualifications, including experience, training, and compliance with Arkansas’ regulations as a guide.

The inspection fee for a typical one-family house varies geographically, just like the cost of housing. The inspection fee varies depending on the size of the house, its age and possible optional services such as septic, well or radon testing.

Request an estimate or call 501-327-9794.
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Why can't I do it myself?
Even the most experienced homeowner lacks the knowledge and expertise of a professional home inspector. An inspector is familiar with the elements of home construction, proper installation, maintenance and home safety. He or she knows how the home’s systems and components are intended to function together, as well as why they fail.

Above all, most buyers find it difficult to remain completely objective and unemotional about the house they really want, and this may have an effect on their judgment. For accurate information, it is best to obtain an impartial, third-party opinion by a professional in the field of home inspection.
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Can a house fail a home inspection?
No. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of a house. It is not an appraisal, which determines market value. It is not a municipal inspection, which verifies local code compliance. A home inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a house, but rather describe its physical condition and indicate what components and systems may need major repair or replacement.
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How do I find a home inspector in Arkansas?
It's important to make sure your inspector is certified by ASHI. You can use the Find An Inspector search tool for a list of home inspectors in your area who belong to the non-profit professional organization. To have a list mailed to you, call 1-800-743-ASHI (2744). Also, real estate agents and brokers are familiar with the service and may be able to provide you with a list of names from which to choose.

Whatever your referral source, you can be assured of your home inspector’s commitment to professional standards and business ethics by choosing one who has membership in ASHI.
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What is ASHI?

The American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) is the oldest organization of professional home inspectors in the US. ASHI has met the requirements of the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA) and offers the only third-party approved home inspector certification program in the US. An ASHI Inspector must comply with the Standards of Practice, adhere to a strict Code of Ethics, complete 21 hours of continuing education annually, and provide the best customer service. In addition, an ASHI Certifed Inspector (ACI) must pass a rigorous national technical examination, perform more than 250 inspections, and have a representitive number of Inspection Reports independently reviewed for compliance with the Standards of Practice. This is called “The ASHI Experience”, and the reason an ASHI Certified Inspector can say “We Speak House.”
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What are the requirements for an Arkansas home inspector?
Under the "Arkansas Home Inspector Registration Act," all home inspectors in the state must register annually with the Arkansas Home Inspector Registration Board (AHIB). Initial applicants must complete 80 hours of training, and pass the national home inspector and Code of Ethics exams. All Inspectors must conduct business in accordance with the Code of Ethics (Section 402), conduct all home inspections in accordance with the Standards of Practice (Sections 401 – 401.14), and complete 14 hours of continuing education annually. For more information, contact the Arkansas Home Inspector Registration Board at 501-683-3710 or info@ahib.org.
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When do I call a home inspector?
Typically, a home inspector is contacted immediately after the contract or purchase agreement has been signed. Before you sign, be sure there is an inspection clause in the sales contract, making your final purchase obligation contingent on the findings of a professional home inspection. This clause should specify the terms and conditions to which both the buyer and seller are obligated.
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Do I have to be there?
While it’s not required that you be present for the inspection, it is highly recommended. You will be able to observe the inspector and ask questions as you learn about the condition of the home and how to maintain it.
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What if the report reveals problems?
No house is perfect. If the inspector identifies problems, it doesn’t mean you should or shouldn’t buy the house, only that you will know in advance what to expect. If your budget is tight, or if you don’t want to become involved in future repair work, this information will be important to you. If major problems are found, a seller may agree to make repairs.
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If the house proves to be in good condition, did I really need an inspection?
Definitely. Now you can complete your home purchase with confidence. You’ll have learned many things about your new home from the inspector’s written report, and will have that information for future reference.
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What should I know about mold?
Mold spores move through indoor and outdoor air continually, and when spores land on damp indoor surfaces they begin to grow. When moisture accumulates, mold growth can occur, particularly if the moisture problem is not addressed. The key to mold is moisture control. If mold is a problem in your home, kill the mold and dry any moisture. Fix leaky plumbing pipes & fixtures or other unwanted water sources. Absorbent materials (such as ceiling tiles & carpet) that have become moldy should be replaced.
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Will the inspector test for Radon?
Standard practice typically does not include the following, for which a specific license to inspect and identify is required: Asbestos, Radon Gas, Lead Paint, Toxic Mold, or Pest Control. A home inspectors may suggest some important Environmental Testing for your property.

Radon is a carcinogenic gas that is extremely hazardous to inhale. Approximately 12% of lung cancer cases (more than 20,000 Americans) are radon-related. Surgeon General's Health Advisory Warning to Americans: breathing air containing radon increases your risk of lung cancer, and is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. You cannot see, smell, or taste radon, but it still may be a problem in your home. Testing is the only way to find out your home's radon levels. Any home can have a radon problem. This means new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements. Nearly 1 out of every 15 homes in the United States is estimated to have an elevated radon level. A qualified individual should conduct a Radon test.
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What forms of payment do you accept?
Home Inspection Plus prefers payment by cash, check, or money order. For your convenience we will also accept all major credit cards with PayPal. Full payment is expected on completion of the inspection.
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